Google Updates Terms of Service for the Physical Web

Screenshot 2015-07-23 08.22.25

Google has updated its Terms of Service for Chrome to clarify the use of the browser as part of the “Physical Web“.

The update, which coincides with the release of beacon detection in Chrome browsers for iOS (with Android support expected in the coming days), clarifies that users won’t be sharing personally identifiable data from their device when they connect to a beacon that broadcasts a URL.

Specifically, the update, which went live on July 21st, informs users that:

If you enable the feature in your device’s Today view, you can use Chrome on your iPhone or iPad to discover objects around you that are broadcasting web addresses as part of the Physical Web. When you use this feature, Chrome sends the web addresses broadcast by these objects to a Google server to find the title of the web page and help rank the results. The information sent to Google to provide this feature does not include any personal information from your device.

Now, it’s not to say that Google isn’t using the data about which URLs are being pinged, and you need to consider your use of location services as well:

If you use Chrome’s location feature, which allows you to share your location with a web site, Chrome will send local network information to Google Location Services to get an estimated location. Learn more about Google Location Services and enabling / disabling location features within Google Chrome. The local network information may include (depending on the capabilities of your device) information about the wifi routers closest to you, cell IDs of the cell towers closest to you, the strength of your wifi or cell signal, and the IP address that is currently assigned to your device. We use the information to process the location request and to operate, support, and improve the overall quality of Chrome and Google Location Services. The collected information described above will be anonymized and aggregated before being used by Google to develop new features or products and services, or to improve the overall quality of any of Google’s other products and services.

But the update is welcome news on the privacy front.

It might not solve the problem of beacon spam if we’re suddenly flooded with millions of the little devices as we wander around the neighbourhood, but it’s somewhat assuring to know that Google isn’t sending personal information back to its servers just because your Chrome browser heard an Eddystone beacon as you walked through the mall.

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3 Responses to “Google Updates Terms of Service for the Physical Web”

  1. Andres Ursueguia

    In two weeks Google is the “fresh new” in the beacon world. First Eddystone, Proximity API and now Chrome “invading” apple world…(before Android..!!!!)
    Is this a “war” declaration?
    We, the developers, as always, need to react quickly and get the most of each solution….

    Thanks for your fresh info Doug….

    Reply
  2. You can use now physical web using Seeketing Technology, because they can connect online+offline behaviour with unique identifier.

    Reply

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